WPS1—Christie Creek Upgrade

Background

The award-winning Christie Creek Upgrade is a $15m design and construct project which provides stormwater detention and flood mitigation.

The project is a part of the City of Onkaparinga’s Water Proofing the South Stage 1 strategy to substitute alternative water sources such as stormwater for traditional sources such as mains water and groundwater, to provide an overall sustainable water use in the City of Onkaparinga.

It is a catchment-wide approach to stormwater management that addresses flooding risks, capitalises on the value of stormwater capture through its storage and distribution and reduces the impact of low water quality on marine environments.

Project scope

The project works included:

  • a high-flow bypass, gross-pollutant removal, sedimentation basin, three-basin wetland and storage at Brodie Road wetlands and Madeira Drive wetlands
  • detention basins at Waverley Way and Woodcroft Drive
  • a 93 ML HDPE-lined storage within the Wilfred Taylor Reserve site with a gravity feed suction line through a storage wall to a skid-pump assembly within a pump, filtration and UV dosing facility
  • over 18 km of pipeline ranging in size from 90 mm to 315 mm
  • three independent pump stations delivering up to 120 L/s to irrigation users
  • operation and maintenance of the pump stations.
  • Through an innovative approach to process and control, three pump stations are connected to a common distribution system, but operate completely independently by electronic controls and logic. Each wetland is able to supply water directly to demands on the network. Filtration and UV treatment occurs at each pump station to achieve water quality requirements.

    Each pump station is remotely monitored and controlled, allowing each site to operate regardless of maintenance or power failures at other sites.
  • Through the use of GPS construction methods, Leed was able to expand the storage facility within Wilfred Taylor Reserve from the planned 80 ML to 93 ML, thus increasing system reliability.
  • At no cost to the client, Leed accelerated the project schedule during the works to allow simultaneous construction on all five earthworks sites during summer, to protect against the risks of inclement weather.
  • Leed worked with the manufacturer of the gross pollutant traps used on the project to develop what we believe to be a pioneering solution to clogging and premature release of leaf matter.
  • The innovative use of a land plane to carry out topsoil stripping and the in-situ conditioning of soil was very effective in minimising dust generation, a major community concern, and also resulted in cost savings over conventional stripping methods.

Key features

  • Through an innovative approach to process and control, three pump stations are connected to a common distribution system, but operate completely independently by electronic controls and logic. Each wetland is able to supply water directly to demands on the network. Filtration and UV treatment occurs at each pump station to achieve water quality requirements.

    Each pump station is remotely monitored and controlled, allowing each site to operate regardless of maintenance or power failures at other sites.
  • Through the use of GPS construction methods, Leed was able to expand the storage facility within Wilfred Taylor Reserve from the planned 80 ML to 93 ML, thus increasing system reliability.
  • At no cost to the client, Leed accelerated the project schedule during the works to allow simultaneous construction on all five earthworks sites during summer, to protect against the risks of inclement weather.
  • Leed worked with the manufacturer of the gross pollutant traps used on the project to develop what we believe to be a pioneering solution to clogging and premature release of leaf matter.
  • The innovative use of a land plane to carry out topsoil stripping and the in-situ conditioning of soil was very effective in minimising dust generation, a major community concern, and also resulted in cost savings over conventional stripping methods.

Outcomes

The project was a model of excellent community engagement, and led to a very high level of community satisfaction.

It was delivered on time and on budget, and with significant added value. It is also financially self-sustaining, with the income from the sale of water covering all servicing, operational and staffing costs as well as providing for future expansion.

Water quality was suitable for harvesting after just 5 months, rather than the 3 years that had been targeted. This was achieved through increased planting densities and staged works bringing forward water into the wetlands whilst they were still under construction. This allowed the client to on-sell water and to realise a return on investment far more quickly than envisaged, as well as bringing advantages to the ecosystem and local communities.

Awards

  • South Australian Civil Contractors Federation Earth Awards 2011: Category 3 Winner (project value $5m–$20m)
  • Stormwater Industry Association (SA) Awards 2011: Commendation—Excellence in Project Management
  • Stormwater Industry Association (National and SA) Awards 2010:Winner—Excellence in Strategic and Master Planning
  • Water Industry Alliancing Award 2010

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